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Compare Investing Strategies. In writing my books and newsletter, I’ve researched a wide range of investing strategies. This periodically updated report shows how some of them are doing. Free. Read the report


Get A Handle On Your Money. Each of these worksheets from my Neatest Little Guide series fits on a single piece of paper, which you can print. From your financial goals to your personal expenses to promising stocks you want to watch, these hardworkers have you covered. Free. Get the worksheets


Research Online. This page links to many of the sites referenced in “The Internet” section on pages 197-203 of The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, 2013 Edition. Free. See the collection


Newsletters. COMING SOON! This page will gather reviews of investment newsletters beyond those summarized on pages 175-177 of The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, 2013 Edition. Free. See the collection


Noncommittal Forecasts. COMING SOON! This will be a collection of new noncommittal market forecasts like those shown on pages 253-254 of The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, 2013 Edition. Free. See the collection


Keep Current. Most of what I write is evergreen — as true one, five, or ten years later as it was on the day it was published. The world does change, however, and occasional updates are necessary. Those updates, along with a few error fixes, are yours for the taking between printings. Free. Browse the updates


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13 Comments

  1. Ainslie French
    Posted March 23, 2012 at 7:12 pm | Permalink

    Dear Jason,

    Re : “Helping people is good but it doesn’t always involve giving something away”.

    Here in Italy we have a saying “Impara l’arte e metterla aparte” – which means ” Learn the art and put it on one side ”

    The idea is to continually learn how to do many different things, even while you are employed, eg. from plumbing and plastering to painting and joinery, or from photography to web site design etc..

    In this way, we always have a defense for harder times.

    I think this is the best counsel which we should all give to ourselves.

    Best Wishes & Tanti Saluti Ainslie

  2. Barron Moore
    Posted May 23, 2012 at 5:37 pm | Permalink

    I was one of the “lucky” ones to get in on the Facebook IPO…wink, wink.

    Currently have 600 shares of FB. As I watch it fall to $31 per share, I wonder is the stock set for doom or will it be the next google?

    In 2004, when google was 100 per share there where many naysayers, and now look at the success of google.

    What are your thoughts on FB future successes and should investors hold or sell?

    • Posted May 24, 2012 at 9:27 am | Permalink

      Definitely sell. The more we learn about Facebook, the less of a business it becomes. It will never catch Google in online advertising because it puts ads where nobody wants to see or click them. People go on Facebook to show photos of their cat and exchange quips with friends. They’re not “doing” anything. Google’s ads, by comparison, appear when people are searching for something and are interested in clicking both organic links and paid ads to find it.

      I wrote earlier this year for subscribers that what Facebook and Google know about us are wildly different, and that Google’s knowledge is more valuable for advertising. Facebook knows your profile: who you are, where you live, the identity of your friends, what music you like, where you went on vacation, and so on. Google knows what you just typed in or did online in search of something. The latter is much more useful.

      Knowing that I like Bob Dylan’s music is not as valuable as knowing that I just typed “Bob Dylan boxed set” into Google’s search. Just because I like Bob Dylan doesn’t mean I want a t-shirt with his photo on it. Facebook thinks that’s exactly what it means, and shows ads supposedly tied to me that way. Worthless. You know how you’ll know when I want a Bob Dylan t-shirt? By waiting for me to search on it and then watching what I click in response. This is why Facebook is no Google, and never will be. Just watch its upcoming earnings reports. I guarantee that they’ll confirm this.

      If you own FB, sell it. If you don’t, avoid it or short it.

  3. Posted August 9, 2012 at 2:09 am | Permalink

    Hello Jason,

    I have been reading your book: The Neatest Little Guide To Stock Market Investing. Its fantastic!

    I am signing up for an RSP plan at work where I am allowed to take 6% of my paycheque and work will contribute 50% (will be 75% in December). My question is “Should I use the funds your mentioned in your book – UDPIX, UMPIX & MVV to hold my RSPs?” Note. This RSP is separate from other investments as work has specified which bank and account type I can use, the investments must be Mutual Funds. . .

    I am looking at the funds and wondering two things:
    The first: Can I use the same method of research that you mention in your book for these funds to see which of the three (or all of them) I should be putting in my RSP?

    The second: Being 21, and looking for some stronger growth potential, how should I split the percentage rate of these three funds. Or do you have any suggestions for mutual funds that may be more suited for someone looking for stronger growth potential? How should I be splitting those in my RSP?

    Any help would be fantastic!

    Thanks,

    Josh

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