Updates to My Books

Typos in TNLGT Stock Market Investing, 2010 Edition

There are some typos in The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, 2010 Edition. Plume and I apologize for any confusion. Here they are:

  • Page 124, Top Line
    In the discussion about buying General Electric (GE) on margin, continued onto this page from the previous one, I wrote, “…then control a $10,000 investment in General Motors.” It should read, “…then control a $10,000 investment in General Electric.”
  • Pages 174-175
    Some text in the Value Line page was mysteriously reformatted so that it flows outside the borders of the page. Nobody knows what went wrong, as the page was a PDF received directly from Value Line. Plume never touched its content, but just placed it where it was supposed to go. Thus, we suspect somebody at the printer came to work after a few too many the night before, and then worked pretty hard to screw this up. The whole point of PDFs is that their format is locked, unbreakable, the same on any platform. Naturally, nobody’s talking at the printer. The page still illustrates the points I make in the section, despite the improper format, but for a perfectionist like me the botched PDF is hard to look at.

  • Updates to TNLGT Stock Market Investing, 2008 Edition

    The stock market is ever-evolving. I use this section to inform you of updates to The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, 2008 Edition that are not yet included in the book. The updates will be added in future printings or future editions. Here they are:

  • The New Dow
    On February 19, 2008, Dow Jones & Company changed two companies listed on the Dow Jones Industrial Average. The two removed were Altria Group (MO) and Honeywell International (HON). The two added were Bank of America (BAC) and Chevron (CVX). This impacts the Dow list and some examples using Dow companies. However, it does not affect the strategies discussed in any way, not even the “Double The Dow” approach.
  • Typos in TNLGT Stock Market Investing, 2008 Edition

    There are some typos in The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, 2008 Edition. Plume and I apologize for any confusion. Here they are:

  • Copyright Page, Library of Congress section
    Reads, “The meanest little guide to stock market investing.” Should read, “The neatest little guide.” Yes, I know, my critics are calling this a Freudian slip. They should know that my next book will be even meaner!
  • Page 120, Paragraph 5, Last Sentence
    Reads, “You saw this for yourself on pages 38 and 39.” Should read, “You saw this for yourself on pages 12 and 39.”
  • Pages 156 and 157
    The spread shows the July 13, 2007 IBM Value Line page, but the text describes the January 12, 2007 IBM page. This is a case of good intentions gone wrong. Value Line thought it was doing my publisher a favor by sending along the most current version of the page, and the designer just dropped it in where told to do so. She didn’t realize that the text described specifically the earlier version. Luckily, the spirit of the example remains intact even though the page supplied does not match the text.

  • Updates to TNLGT Stock Market Investing, 2004 Edition

    All of these changes have been made in the 2008 edition of The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, which I recommend getting. I’m keeping the list of changes here for those who still have a copy of the 2004 edition:

  • The New Dow
    On April 8, 2004, Dow Jones & Company changed three companies listed on the Dow Jones Industrial Average. The three removed were Eastman Kodak (EK), AT&ampT (T), and International Paper (IP). The three added were American International Group (AIG), Pfizer (PFE), and Verizon Communications (VZ). This impacts the Dow list and some examples in Chapter 7 “Doubling The Dow”. However, it does not affect the strategies discussed in any way.
  • Worth Magazine Is Now Worthless
    On page 133, I began my review of Worth with the simple words, “I love Worth.” I went on to write that its columnists are second to none and include Peter Lynch. I mentioned the excellent global investing section, the feature showing what stocks successful fund managers are buying along with their reasons, the section picking the brains of top newsletter editors, and the fact that the magazine utilizes unpopular measurements such as price-to-sales and quality of earnings. To my great disappointment, the magazine was purchased by CurtCo Publishing and is now published under the auspices of the Robb Report. You may recognize that name. Robb Report is the magazine for the already-wealthy to read as they manage their wealth. Out with investing; in with philanthropy. Sayonara stocks; hello three-generation family stewardship legacies. Exit Peter Lynch on undervalued stocks; enter former President Bill Clinton on charitable causes. There is nothing left for investors. You can see the current irrelevance here. I will remove my recommendation.
  • Typos in TNLGT Stock Market Investing, 2004 Edition

    There are six known typos in the first printing of The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, 2004 Edition. They will be fixed in the second printing. Plume and I apologize for any confusion. Here they are:

  • Page 5, Paragraph 1, Sentence 3
    Reads, “Sell it later for $90 and your return is 2 percent.” Should read, “Sell it later for $90 and your return is 200 percent.”
  • Page 37, Paragraph 4, Sentence 3
    Reads, “It’s the most common measure of a whethr a stock is a good deal.” Delete the “a” before “whether”. Should read, “It’s the most common measure of whether a stock is a good deal.”
  • Page 66, Paragraph 1, Sentences 5 and 6
    Reads, “Lynch offers several examples, two of which I show here. One is for Coca-Cola, a stalwart company.” Should read, “Lynch offers several examples, one of which I show here. It’s for Coca-Cola, a stalwart company.” Also, the following paragraph (beginning “Coca-Cola is selling at…”) is an excerpt from Lynch’s book and should be formatted as such.
  • Page 108, Table
    The ticker symbol for Hewlett-Packard is shown as HWP. It should be HPQ.
  • Page 113, Table
    The company name in row 2 reads, “General Motors”. It should read, “General Electric“.
  • Page 208, Paragraph 1
    The paragraph beginning, “In general, a P/E ratio that’s…” is part of the Peter Lynch quote above it, and should be formatted as such.
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    6 Comments

    1. Jim Scott
      Posted December 14, 2012 at 2:18 am | Permalink

      I have the 2010 version of The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing. I’d like to say I have read many investment books and it ranks among my favorites. I just wanted to let you know that I spotted a typo. On page 123 you talk about buying General Electric stock on margin. On page 124 this is labeled as General Motors. Just thought you’d want to know.

      • Posted January 18, 2013 at 4:50 pm | Permalink

        Thank you, Jim! I added it above. If you happen to spot any errors in the 2013 edition, please let me know and I’ll add them, too.

    2. V. Fernandes
      Posted March 18, 2015 at 4:01 am | Permalink

      I have read the 2010 Edition of TNLGT Stocking Market Investing & in Appendix 2 you say I can get a printable sheet at http://www.jasonkelly.com/resources. I have have spent hours trying to trace the printable sheets, but with no luck. Can you help, please.

      Are all the references to your website, that you make on the 2010 Edition, are they still valid?

      • Posted March 18, 2015 at 11:50 am | Permalink

        You’re quite right that the ETF trading cluster sheet is not on the site at the moment. I wondered what happened to it, then realized we took it down to update it with new 3x vehicles, but never put it back up. I’ll track down who has it now and get the refreshed PDF back on the site. Thanks for pointing this out!

    3. Barbara O
      Posted September 27, 2015 at 11:16 pm | Permalink

      I just got through reading your 2013 edition ofStock Market Investing – wow, packed with great info and ready to start!! However, came to your website and not able to see how I can print your “Stocks To Watch Worksheet” that you have in your book. Please Help.

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